Sandon Dock, Liverpool

Interface Contracts has won praise for being “proactive under difficult circumstances” from GCA after being called in to refurbish BAFF cells at Liverpool WwTW’s Sandon Dock.

Peter Brett of GCA emphasised the degree of difficulty faced by Interface in the £3 million contract as it had “come in dribs and drabs.”

Describing Interface as “being very much part of the overall team”, he added:

“They were very proactive and that helped tremendously. They really played their part in the success of the project.”

Liverpool WwTW which was built on the old Sandon Dock – and is still most often referred to by that name – faced a major problem in that the cells in its BAFF plant had begun to fail.

The answer lay in automating the system which controls the flow of water through the D screens into each cell at what was the first ever treatment works to serve Liverpool and Bootle, so ending the wastewater discharge directly into the River Mersey.

GCA, the main contractor, called on Interface to refurbish the BAFF cells. This involved an Interface team of four dealing with flow meters, level switches and actuated valves on each cell along with modification to the DH+ communication network between each of the BIOFOR control panels.

Activities included the preparation of BCDs, loop diagrams, tray routing diagrams along with the installation itself and testing the actuated valves.

Working entirely on cable containment, this required some 60 to 70 meters of scaffolding to enable the Interface team to work at the height of 5 meters around the BAFF plant.

GCA called on Interface to initially handle six BAFF cells, then extended the contact for the remaining eight cells along with a package called the X works.

“The job was completed in line with GCA’s schedule, no dates were missed and the contract was completed within budget,”
says Paul McCreery, the Interface Project Manager.